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Assist. Amina Mustafa Abd Elfatah Farag :: Publications:

Title:
The Scenes of the Eleventh Hour in the Books of the Other World As Viewed on the Monuments of the Modern Stat
Authors: Sana Abdul Azim El-Adli -Abdul Hamid Saad Azab-Nabil Mokhtar El-Far
Year: 2015
Keywords: Not Available
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Local/International: International
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Abstract:

This study contains the scenes of the eleventh hour in the books of the other world as viewed on the monuments of the modern state; it is an hour which represents, more than any of night hours, the preparation and equipment to the sunrise of the Sun God, and his resurrection in the following hour, as well as the hell which depicts various types of punishment and torment prepared for the enemies of Auxerre God, either physically or morally. This study consists of an introduction and three chapters followed by a conclusion, references and appendices. The first chapter is entitled "Sources and Scenes of the Eleventh Hour in the Book IMY- DW3T”. It addresses several issues. First, comes the definition of the IMY- DW3T book as a branch of funerary (religious) literature, followed by an inventory of the sources of the eleventh hour in the royal tombs and in individual graves according to the historical sequence of each of them, as well as the distribution of hours on the walls of these graves and identifying the positions of recording the hour inside them. Second, comes a discussion about the scenes of the hour through description, analysis, and comparison with those of other likely hours. The second chapter, entitled "Sources and Scenes of the Eleventh Hour in the Book of Gates", is allocated to cast light on the sources of the hour within the royal tombs with their coffins. It has been found that the sources of the eleventh hour were recorded on four archaeological sites, and they are, by chronological order, as follows: Auxerre Shrine, the ark of King City I, the tomb of Queen Tausert, and the tomb of Ramses VI. This chapter also provides a description and analysis of the scenes of the hour and identification of the differences and similarities between its gates and the gates of other hours. The third chapter, which came under the title "Sources and Scenes of the Eleventh Hour in the Book of Night and Their Correspondents in the Books of The Caves and The Earth," deals with many points including: an inventory of the sources and scenes of the hour in the Book of Night which revealed that the tomb of Ramses VI is the only source of this hour; and an inventory of the sources of the corresponding items of the hour in the Book of Caves and determining the positions of recording the hour, and providing the corresponding scenes in section V. This chapter also addresses the identification of the Book of Earth as a branch of funerary literature, and archaeologists’ diligence in putting a proper name for it, as well as discussing the corresponding sources of the hour in the Book of the Earth. It became clear that this hour has been recorded on five archaeological sites, arranged chronologically as follows: the Auxerre shrine, King Merenptah’s tomb, Queen Tausert’s tomb, King Ramses III’s tomb, and King Ramses VI’s tomb. There is no explicit evidence of the scenes of the eleventh hour in the Book of the Earth; thus, the researcher concluded that the scenes that correspond to the eleventh hour were: the first scene of the first record in Part A, the third scene of the first record in Part A, the fourth scene of the third record in Part A, and four scenes of Part D—these scenes in essence and content include the concept of the hour under study either in the text or in the corresponding form of the scenes. The researcher concluded this study with a conclusion highlighting the most important findings of the study. She also ended the study with some tables and a list of Arabic and foreign references used in the thesis.

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