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Dr. Anwar Abdel Fattah Abdel Malek El Shafey :: Publications:

Title:
Histomorphometric and Immunohistochemical Characteristics of the Skins of Egyptian Water Buf-falo (Bubalus bubalis) and One-Humped Camel (Camelus dromedarius)
Authors: A El-shafey; M Emam; A Kassab
Year: 2017
Keywords: Skin; histomorphome-try; immunohistochemistry; buffalo; camel.
Journal: Journal of veterinary anatomy
Volume: 10
Issue: 1
Pages: 1-16
Publisher: Emam
Local/International: International
Paper Link: Not Available
Full paper Anwar Abdel Fattah Abdel Malek El Shafey_7.pdf
Supplementary materials Not Available
Abstract:

The current work focuses on studying the histomorphological characterizations of the skin of Egyptian water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) and one-humped camels (Camelus dromedarius). Therefore, few in depth histological, morphometric and immunohistochemical comparative studies are so far available. This study was carried out on the skin specimens of fourteen adult, male Egyptian water buffaloes and one-humped camels (seven/each). Buffalo's skin showed several histological similarities with that of camel, but there were some histomorphometric and immunohistochemical differences. In spite of being the epidermis of buffalo significantly thicker than in camel, the horny layer of camel's skin was significantly thicker than buffalo, in addi- tion, it appeared laminar and weavy, while that of buffalo appeared com- pact. Hair follicles were more numerous in camel than in buffalo while sweat glands had larger diameter in buffalo. The secretory epithelium of the sweat glands varied from cuboidal with central nuclei in buffalos to columnar with basal nuclei in camels. Immunohistochemically, vimentin and melanosome were over expressed in camels than buffaloes. It is concluded that buffalo's skin was thicker than camel, which put it up for the production of skin quality requirements of the leather industry. However, higher vimentin content in camel skin may suggest higher tensile strength than in buffalo. Furthermore, it is reported that over expression of melanosome in camel's skin than buffalo may play a role in photoprotection against harmful sunny rays in harsh hot climate of the desert.

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