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Dr. Gehan Abd-el-Rahman Ahmed Hamdy :: Publications:

Title:
Effect of Fire Protection Materials on FRP-Strengthened Concrete Axial Members
Authors: Nadia M. Nofal and Gehan A. Hamdy
Year: 2005
Keywords: Fire protection, elevated temperature; concrete; columns; advanced composite materials; FRP; CFRP; GFRP; confinement.
Journal: Journal of Engineering and Applied Science
Volume: 52
Issue: 6
Pages: 1123-1141
Publisher: Faculty of Engineering, Cairo University, Egypt
Local/International: International
Paper Link: Not Available
Full paper Gehan Abd-el-Rahman Ahmed Hamdy_EFFECT OF FIRE PROTECTION MATERIALS ON FRP STRENGTHENED CONCRETE AXIAL MEMBERS.pdf
Supplementary materials Not Available
Abstract:

The present research addresses an issue which is a major concern about the use of fiber reinforced polymers (FRP) in retrofit and strengthening applications. This paper presents an experimental investigation of the effectiveness of different fire protection materials and techniques on the efficiency of concrete axial members strengthened by FRP and subjected to high temperatures such as in the case of fire. Three locally available and economic materials are investigated: ordinary Portland cement mortar, Perlite and Vermiculite. These were applied with different thicknesses over FRP wrapped concrete specimens and subjected to elevated temperature in a closed furnace. For each case, variation of the temperature on the underlying concrete surface and the ultimate load carrying capacity were studied in order to explore and compare the effectiveness of these protection layers. Protective layers were applied over concrete cylinders strengthened using glass or carbon FRP wraps and subjected to elevated temperature to investigate the effect of fire protection materials on ultimate axial load carrying capacity and mode of failure. The results demonstrated that cylinders strengthened with FRP and protected using perlite mortar and ceramic fiber resulted in significant fire protection compared to unprotected FRP strengthened cylinders.

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