You are in:Home/Publications/The Reception and Inspiration of the Japanese Cultural Heritage in the Theatre of Tawfiq Al-hakim and Yukio Mishima : Comparative Study on "Ahla Al-kahf" and "Yoroboshi

Dr. nglaa fathy hafez :: Publications:

Title:
The Reception and Inspiration of the Japanese Cultural Heritage in the Theatre of Tawfiq Al-hakim and Yukio Mishima : Comparative Study on "Ahla Al-kahf" and "Yoroboshi
Authors: نجلاء فتحي حافظ
Year: 2017
Keywords: Not Available
Journal: Not Available
Volume: Not Available
Issue: Not Available
Pages: Not Available
Publisher: Not Available
Local/International: International
Paper Link: Not Available
Full paper Not Available
Supplementary materials Not Available
Abstract:

This research studies the reception and inspiration of the Japanese Cultural Tradition in the theatre of Tawfiq Al-hakim and Yukio Mishima applying the analytical method of Intertextuality on "Ahla Al-kahf" (1933) and "Yoroboshi" (1960) from Comparative perspective. Tawfiq Al-Hakim was inspired by the Qur'an, the Old Testament, and the Japanese legend "Urashima Taro" in the play "Ahla Al-kahf".  Al-Hakim’s play expresses his own ideas about religion, love and transcending of space and time. On the other hand, Yukio Mishima wrote his play "Yoroboshi" using the classical theme “No play” by Knze Motomasa. Al-hakim and Mishima wrote the above-mentioned plays inspired by the traditional Japanese cultural heritage i.e. the Japanese classics and legends. Through clarifying and analyzing the dramatic structure and dialogue of both plays we can understand the mutual relativity between the texts using these three keywords: "religious thinking", "love" and "transcending of space and time ". By discussing the religious thought in both plays, Al-hakim highlights the complex relationship between love and religious thoughts arising from space and time development. Al-Hakim also throws light on the impact of the creation of climax scenes using the "Legend of Urashima”:   which recounts the difficulty of believing in the restoring of the soul in the modern world. At the same time, this legend suggests the possibility of recalling the future by the power of love and faith. Mishima expresses the negative reality of postwar "modernity" through adopting the Buddhist’s belief of "Noh music" which vividly revealed the flourishing mythical musical concept according to Buddhist norms. Mishima identifies himself with the protagonist in his novel and reflects his sense of surviving guilt through him. He also recalls and rejects the massive destruction of the war in Japan.

Google ScholarAcdemia.eduResearch GateLinkedinFacebookTwitterGoogle PlusYoutubeWordpressInstagramMendeleyZoteroEvernoteORCIDScopus